Fun Wedding Facts Trivia

June 22, 2012 at 12:58 pm 1 comment

One of the most wonderful days of your life is fast approaching, your wedding day. Did you ever wonder where some of the traditions come from? Read on for some fun facts and trivia regarding wedding customs.

When Was the First Bachelor Party?

The tradition of the bachelor party dates back to ancient Greece, when Spartan men would toast their soon-to-be-wed comrade the night before his marriage. Bachelor parties are a popular modern tradition allowing friends of the groom to throw a shindig marking the groom’s last night as a single man. Originally, the bachelor party took place the night before the wedding day; this practice is fading in favor for parties taking place over an entire weekend at a favorite destination and occurring several weeks before the wedding. Activities often involve drinking, friendship and revelry. Other names for the bachelor party include stag or buck’s night. The female equivalent is called the bachelorette party.

Who Were the First To Wear Wedding Rings?

Men of ancient Egyptian culture gave their brides a wedding band as a symbol of faith and to signify the groom’s assurance of her ability to keep a good household and be a great wife.  This tradition spread to other countries including ancient Greece, Greek men would present a ring to the father of the bride as part of the formal custom of asking for her hand in marriage. The tradition as we know it now in modern times began with the Romans of the second century BC. Similar to the Greeks, the Roman man would give a gold ring to the father of the bride as part of the engagement ritual. After marriage, the bride only wore the gold ring in public to indicate she was married to a man of status. The Roman wives wore their rings on the fourth finger of their left hand believing a vein inside the fourth finger ran directly to the heart.

Who Was the First to Wear a White Wedding Dress?

Interesting fact, the first official documentation of a white gown as attire for a wedding occurred in 1406 and the honor goes to Princess Philippa of England, daughter of King Henry IV. During this period, white was considered a color for mourning but Princess Philippa chose white because it was her favorite color. The practice of wearing a white dress for a wedding did not take hold in Western civilization until 1840, when Queen Victoria married Prince Albert. Since then, white including variations of white from ecru to vanilla remains as the most popular color for a wedding gown.

Where Did the Custom of ‘Something Old, New and Blue’ Come From?

Actually, the correct form of the phrase is:

Something old, something new

Something borrowed, something blue

And a silver sixpence in her shoe.

Sources are divided on the exact year the rhyme became a part of wedding traditions, some say Old English, most contend during the Victorian Era, but they all agree on the meaning. “Something old” represents permanence and continuity; “something new” indicates optimism for a bright future; “Something borrowed” signifies happiness; “something blue” refers to love, fidelity and purity; “And a silver sixpence in her shoe” symbolizes wealth and good fortune. A sixpence is an old type of British coin struck in production from 1551-1971 and considered a lucky charm for brides to wear inside her wedding day shoes. The rhyme represents a charming wedding custom for brides to embrace.

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